Split: Things to see away from the palace

  • Split

    © Matt Field/Time Out

    © Matt Field/Time Out
  • Bačvice beach, Split

    © Matt Field/Time Out

    © Matt Field/Time Out
  • Hajduk supporters, Split

    © Carly Calhoun/Time Out

    © Carly Calhoun/Time Out
  • Split harbour

    © Matt Field/Time Out

    © Matt Field/Time Out
  • Grgur Ninski statue, Split

    © Matt Field/Time Out

    © Matt Field/Time Out
  • Split market

    © Carly Calhoun/Time Out

    © Carly Calhoun/Time Out
  • The statue of Grgur Ninski, Split.

    © Matt Field/Time Out

    © Matt Field/Time Out
  • Jardin park, Split

    © Matt Field/Time Out

    © Matt Field/Time Out

Just outside the palace, opposite the National Theatre stands the Archaeological Museum (Zrinsko-Frankopanska 25, 021 329 340, www.mdc.hr/split-arheoloski; open June-Sept 9am-2pm, 4-8pm Mon-Sat; Oct-May 9am-2pm, 4-8pm Mon-Fri, 9am-2pm Sat; 20kn). Key historical finds from the nearby Roman capital of Salona are the main draw here – mosaics, sarcophagi and such like. A short walk north-west takes you to the Poljud stadium, home of local football club Hajduk Split and still a modern-architecture masterpiece 34 years after its opening.

Two further cultural attractions are set within reasonably easy reach. The most rewarding is Ivan Meštrović’s own Gallery (šetalište Ivana Meštrovića 46, 021 340 800, www.mdc.hr/mestrovic; open May-Sept 9am-7pm Tue-Sun; Oct-Apr 9am-4pm Tue-Sat, 10am-3pm Sun; 30kn), a neo-classical villa built by the sculptor himself in 1931. Nearby, the Kaštelet at No.39 (same admission ticket) accommodates his religious carvings. The beach below, Zvončac, is less well known but has a couple of decent bars on it.

Most locals prefer bustling Bačvice beach to the east. Beyond it, the waterfront developments at Firula and Zenta contain key restaurants, mainstream nightspots and the tennis centre where Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanišević first played.

Things to see outside Split's Diocletian Palace

Kaštelet
Sights